A Personal Book Classification

Every reader has their own tastes. Some books and writers that move everyone may do nothing at all to you. Whilst some books leave such a high impact that you think of them for days. I decided to classify the books I read in 2018. It’s a very personal classification, the kind that I think every reader deserves.

 

The meta classification is as follows:
a – Facts, interpreted, crafted
b – New ideas
c – stories of others’ lives
d – stories of others’ lives plus
e – stories of other worlds
f – stories of the spirit
g – stories outside the regular

In my personal book classification, the books that win and the ones I aspire to read more of and write like are stories of the spirit (Moby Dick), stories of other worlds (Charlotte’s Web). The ones that inspire me are facts interpreted, crafted (non fiction like WW2) and stories of other’s lives plus (fiction that has satire, deep themes and introspection into characters like We or Macbeth)
Stories of other’s lives are books I will probably still pick up from time to time but they usually leave me empty (Freedom, The Secret River)

Four made it to the high impact, high enjoyability mark – Moby Dick, The New York Trilogy, Imperium and Charlotte’s Web. Three of those were stories of the spirit.

Most non fiction were medium enjoyability and medium impact. They gave me specialized information. No doubt I will continue to read them

Some fiction and a couple of non fiction didn’t have a high impact but gave me much enjoyment. I hope to find more books like these

The Terracotta Dog, a Montalbano story amused me greatly and didn’t have any impact on me. I want to find more books like this that allows one to forget and simply take pleasure from.

Twelve books gave me low to medium enjoyability and low impact. A few of them were written by good writers. I will return to them after a while.
I struggled classifying the only Japanese book on my list. I enjoyed the fact that they were in Japanese but the stories were too two-dimensional for my enjoyment.
The others, well, I finished reading them but I won’t be thinking about them again.

What a revealing exercise. Every reader should undertake it!

Title Writer Key Impact/Enjoyability Key Desc F/NF
Imperium Ryszard Kapuściński a high impact, high enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
The New York Trilogy Paul Auster f high impact, high enjoyability Stories of the spirit F
Moby Dick Herman Melville f high impact, high enjoyability Stories of the spirit F
The Terracotta Dog Andrea Camilleri g low impact, high enjoyability stories of outside ‘regular’ life F
The Secret River Kate Grenville c low impact, low enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Read Real Japanese Kaoru Kitamura c low impact, low enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Raymie Nightingale Kate DiCamillo c low impact, medium enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
An Artist of the Floating World Kazuo Ishiguro c low impact, low enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Freedom Jonathan Franzen c low impact, medium enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Read Real Japanese Otsuichi c low impact, low enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
The Beggar Maid Alice Munro c low impact, medium enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Read Real Japanese Banana Yoshimoto c low impact, low enjoyability Stories of other’s lives F
Peak Anders Ericsson & Robert Pool b low impact, low enjoyability New ideas NF
Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World Niall Ferguson a low impact, low enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
The Art of War Sun Tzu b low impact, low enjoyability New ideas NF
The Black Swan Nassim Nicholas Taleb b low impact, medium enjoyability New ideas NF
Art of Fiction David Lodge a low impact, medium enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
Why I Read: The Serious Pleasure of Books Wendy Lesser a low impact, medium enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
A Moveable Feast Ernest Hemingway b medium impact, high enjoyability New ideas F
We Yevgeny Zamyatin d medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of other’s lives that dig deep F
Tom’s Midnight Garden Philippa Pearce e medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of other worlds, move beyond the realm into the dream F
The Second World War Anthony Beever a medium impact, high enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
Comet in Moominland Tove Jansson e medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of other worlds, move beyond the realm into the dream F
Macbeth William Shakespeare d medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of other’s lives that dig deep F
Charlotte’s Web E. B. White e high impact, high enjoyability Stories of other worlds, move beyond the realm into the dream F
Zen in the Art of Writing Ray Bradbury b medium impact, medium enjoyability New ideas NF
India After Gandhi Ramachandran Guha a medium impact, high enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
The Discovery of India Jawaharlal Nehru a medium impact, medium enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
A History of Modern Russia Robert Service a medium impact, medium enjoyability Fact, interpreted and crafted NF
Steppenwolf Hermann Hesse f medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of the spirit F
Zorba the Greek Nikos Kazantzakis f medium impact, medium enjoyability Stories of the spirit F
An Imaginary Life David Malouf f medium impact, high enjoyability Stories of the spirit F

2 thoughts on “A Personal Book Classification

Add yours

  1. Oooooh I’ve got to save this and give it a crack some quiet afternoon! Usually, my classification of books is very binary – it’s a “yeah” or a “nah” 😂 not the most nuanced system!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haaa Sheree, thanks for the comment! The ya/nah system is a pretty legit one too. BUT I found this more detailed experience really rewarding. It just reminded me of the books I love, the books I have to challenge myself to love and the ones where it’s acceptable for me to feel nothing at all;) Tell me if you need any ideas when you get down to it:)

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: